Research

Collective responsibility in Strata Apartments

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Bill Randolph

Published: In E. Altmann & M. Gabriel (eds) Multi-Owned Property in the Asia-Pacific Region: Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords: Building management, By-laws/rules/CC&Rs, Disputes/conflict, Governance, Information available to owners and residents, Law, Qualitative research/interviews,

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Summary:

All multi-owned developments are, by definition, owned collectively by multiple individual owners. While for some shared ownership can be part of the attraction, for others it is a necessary evil. This chapter focuses on the experience of strata title in NSW, Australia. Based on consultation with strata owners, this chapter highlights the mismatch that can occur between the responsibilities of owners as members of an owners corporation (body corporate) as enshrined in legislation and people’s knowledge and acceptance of those responsibilities, and discusses why this mismatch occurs.

Postproduced: How Adaptive Redesign and Participatory Approaches can Transform Ageing Housing

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Sandra Loschke

Published: In G. Cairns, G. Artopoulos and K. Day (eds) From Conflict to Inclusion in Housing: Interaction of communities, residents and activists, London: UCL Press, pp. 71-86.

This paper has been peer reviewed

Keywords: Architecture, Building improvements, Design, Development, Redevelopment / termination, Sustainability,

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Summary:

Cities around the world are struggling to provide adequate housing for growing populations. Concurrently, the significant amount of housing stock built during the post-war housing boom (1950–80) is now ageing and in need of repair. To date, the discussion surrounding both issues – growth and redevelopment – has primarily focused on the provision of new housing, predominantly multiunit apartments for medium-to high-density living. However, much existing housing stock offers rich opportunities for creating more liveable, affordable and sustainable solutions.

Rethinking Housing Solutions: Adaptive Redesign Approaches for Ageing Apartment Buildings

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Sandra Loschke

Published: CONFERENCE: FUTURE HOUSING: GLOBAL CITIES AND REGIONAL PROBLEMS Architecture_MPS; Swinburne University of Technology Melbourne: 09—10 June, 2016

Keywords: Architecture, Building improvements, Design, Development, Redevelopment / termination, Sustainability,

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Summary:

A raft of challenges face multi-unit residential housing design, at the forefront of which is a triad of interrelated needs – to make dwellings more economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. To date, this discussion has primarily focused on the provision of high quality new housing. However, the existing housing stock offers rich opportunities for creating more liveable, affordable, and environmentally-friendly solutions, which remain largely underexplored in Australia. In this paper we explore the opportunities of what we term “adaptive redesign” of existing multi-owned housing.

Losing Control at Home?

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope

Published: In R. Freestone and E. Liu (eds) Place and Placelessness Revisited, Routledge: New York, 108-119.

This paper has been peer reviewed

Keywords: Home ownership, Liveability, Policy, Rental housing, Sociology,

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Summary:

Two significant changes in housing patterns have impacted on the ability of people to become attached to, and identify with, their dwelling because of tensions between these ways of living and dominant cultural representations of the dwelling as home. These are an increase in multi-unit property ownership and long-term private renting. However these phenomena need not necessarily result in people feeling less attached to their dwellings if dominant social norms and constructs of the dwelling as home, and home ownership in particular, are challenged.

Weak Tie Relationships in High Density Residential Areas and the Types of Spaces Used to Maintain Them

Author or co-authors: Sian Thompson, Hazel Easthope, Gethin Davison

Published: proceeding of the State of Australian Cities Conference, Gold Coast, 9-11 December 2015

This paper has been peer reviewed

Keywords: Community, Liveability, Planning, Qualitative research/interviews,

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Summary:

The next few decades will see a significant increase in high density development in strategic centres in Australian cities, if current city plans are put into practice. The social consequences of this shift towards higher density are profound and will have a significant impact on Australian cities’ social sustainability. This research provides insights into how people use spaces socially in high density, and which kinds of spaces are likely to facilitate the maintenance of weak ties. These findings can inform the design and planning of socially sustainable high density areas.