Research

The Legal Psychology of Disclosures in the Multi-owned Properties Context

Author or co-authors: Nicole Johnston, Karla Johnston

Published: Presented at the 13th Annual Australian College of Community Association Lawyers Conference, Melbourne 2018

Keywords: Conflicts of interest, Contracts, Information available to owners and residents, Law, Psychology,

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Summary:

Drawing on insights from psychological theories and understandings of mental processing, the paper evaluates the effectiveness of disclosures in aiding purchasing decisions and in mitigating the (potential) harmful effects of conflicts of interest in the multi-owned property environment.

Socio-legal approaches to property law research.

Author or co-authors: Sarah Blandy

Published: Property Law Review (2014) 3 (3), 166-175

Keywords: Comparative research, Governance, Law,

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Summary:

This contribution to the special issue addresses the "what, how, what to be wary of, and why" questions about socio-legal approaches to researching property law. As will become clear, it is not possible to talk about "the" socio-legal approach; this article starts with these definitional difficulties and then discusses the range of research which can be labelled as socio-legal. Following an overview of the challenges faced by the socio-legal researcher, the article concludes by assessing the unique perspective provided by this research approach, with reference to multi-owned properties.

Collective Property: Owning and Sharing Residential Space

Author or co-authors: Sarah Blandy

Published: Modern Studies in Property Law vol 7, ed. N. Hopkins, 152-172.

Funders: British Academy

Keywords: Community, Public/private, Qualitative research/interviews, Sustainability,

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Summary:

The aim of this chapter is to examine, using illustrations from a co-housing development, how property is 'constituted from the bottom up' by those who live it. It is based on empirical research into how residents share and manage the non-privately owned spaces that they hold in common.

Risky facilities: Analysis of crime concentration in high-rise buildings

Author or co-authors: Sacha Reid, Michael Townsley, Danielle Reynald, John Rynne

Funders: Criminology Research Council

Keywords: Building management, Law, Planning, Policy,

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Summary:

This is the trends and issues paper derived from the larger project on Crime in High Rise Buildings project. The research investigated crime hotspots within the Surfers Paradise, Australia suburb which is dominated by high density and a mix of holiday and residential tenure types. By analysing actual rates and types of crime, guardianship levels, building management styles and perceptions of fear of crime, the research reveals how planning policies and high-rise building management styles can coalesce to create safer vertical communities.

Examining developer actions that embed protracted conflict and dysfunctionality in staged multi-owned residential schemes

Author or co-authors: Nicole Johnston, Sacha Reid, Chris Guilding

Published: Proceedings of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society 2012 annual conference

Keywords: Developer control, Developer handover, Governance, Qualitative research/interviews,

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Summary:

Anecdotal evidence suggests that if inappropriate decisions are made by developers in the initial establishment phase of multi-owned residential schemes, conflict and long-term dysfunctionalism for the eventual owners result. This paper maps out practises commonly utilised by developers in establishing staged, multi-owned residential developments and the consequences that these practises can have on a scheme in the short and long-term. Findings stemming from twelve semi-structured interviews conducted with key strata and community title industry experts from around Australia.