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Photovoltaics on Apartment Buildings

Author or co-authors: Mike Roberts, Anna Bruce, Iain MacGill, Jessie Copper, Navid Haghdadi

Funders: Energy Consumers Australia

Keywords: Building improvements, Environment, Sustainability, Utilities / networks,

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Summary:

Although Australia has over 2 million solar households, the 10% of Australians who live in apartments are still missing out on cheap, clean energy. This final report from CEEM's three-year research project includes an assessment of the scale and nature of the solar opportunity and analysis of the costs and benefits of different technical configurations and financial arrangements. It also identifies some of the challenges preventing apartment residents from installing solar PV and suggest some policy reforms that could help overcome the key regulatory barriers.

Experiencing Density: The implications of strata titling for urban renewal in Australian cities

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Bill Randolph

Published: In K. Ruming (ed) Urban Regeneration and Australian Cities: Policies, processes and projects of contemporary change, London: Ashgate.

Keywords: Construction, Defects, Design, Development, Disputes/conflict, Governance, Law, Planning, Policy, Redevelopment / termination, Repairs and maintenance,

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Summary:

In the 21st century Australian city, urban renewal has become synonymous with higher residential densities. This chapter discusses: the potential for conflict; problems of building design, build quality and defects and ongoing problems with major repairs and maintenance; strata ownership as a formidable barrier to further renewal in areas that otherwise would be prime sites for redevelopment. We draw on a series of interlinked and on-going research projects undertaken by the authors and colleagues over the last decade looking at aspects of the emerging strata title sector in Australia.

Collective responsibility in Strata Apartments

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Bill Randolph

Published: In E. Altmann & M. Gabriel (eds) Multi-Owned Property in the Asia-Pacific Region: Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords: Building management, By-laws/rules/CC&Rs, Disputes/conflict, Governance, Information available to owners and residents, Law, Qualitative research/interviews,

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Summary:

All multi-owned developments are, by definition, owned collectively by multiple individual owners. While for some shared ownership can be part of the attraction, for others it is a necessary evil. This chapter focuses on the experience of strata title in NSW, Australia. Based on consultation with strata owners, this chapter highlights the mismatch that can occur between the responsibilities of owners as members of an owners corporation (body corporate) as enshrined in legislation and people’s knowledge and acceptance of those responsibilities, and discusses why this mismatch occurs.

Postproduced: How Adaptive Redesign and Participatory Approaches can Transform Ageing Housing

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Sandra Loschke

Published: In G. Cairns, G. Artopoulos and K. Day (eds) From Conflict to Inclusion in Housing: Interaction of communities, residents and activists, London: UCL Press, pp. 71-86.

This paper has been peer reviewed

Keywords: Architecture, Building improvements, Design, Development, Redevelopment / termination, Sustainability,

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Summary:

Cities around the world are struggling to provide adequate housing for growing populations. Concurrently, the significant amount of housing stock built during the post-war housing boom (1950–80) is now ageing and in need of repair. To date, the discussion surrounding both issues – growth and redevelopment – has primarily focused on the provision of new housing, predominantly multiunit apartments for medium-to high-density living. However, much existing housing stock offers rich opportunities for creating more liveable, affordable and sustainable solutions.

Rethinking Housing Solutions: Adaptive Redesign Approaches for Ageing Apartment Buildings

Author or co-authors: Hazel Easthope, Sandra Loschke

Published: CONFERENCE: FUTURE HOUSING: GLOBAL CITIES AND REGIONAL PROBLEMS Architecture_MPS; Swinburne University of Technology Melbourne: 09—10 June, 2016

Keywords: Architecture, Building improvements, Design, Development, Redevelopment / termination, Sustainability,

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Summary:

A raft of challenges face multi-unit residential housing design, at the forefront of which is a triad of interrelated needs – to make dwellings more economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. To date, this discussion has primarily focused on the provision of high quality new housing. However, the existing housing stock offers rich opportunities for creating more liveable, affordable, and environmentally-friendly solutions, which remain largely underexplored in Australia. In this paper we explore the opportunities of what we term “adaptive redesign” of existing multi-owned housing.